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administration is rejecting calls to plant -- grand, sita nsa leaker edward snowden. in a letter given to a german lawmaker last week, snowden called on the u.s. to drop charges against him, writing "speaking the truth is not a crime." on sunday, dan pfeiffer ruled out clemency and said snowden should return to face criminal charges. in some of the latest snowden's disclosures, the "new york times" reports the nsa intercepted the talking points of view into secretary -- you would secretary-general ban ki- moon ahead of a meeting with president obama in april. we will have more on the story with the reporter scott shane after the headlines. a newly disclosed document shows the british government justified detaining the partner journalist glenn greenwald by accusing him of espionage and terrorism. in august, david maranda was on his way home to brazil when he was held from his nine hours at london's heathrow airport. he faced repeated interrogation, had many personal items seized, .ncluding some -- thumb drives an internal police order authorizing greatest attention from that they says -
three years ago, but later resurfaced. snowden seek asylum in germany next? there is heated debate on that question just a week after allegations that the nsa was tapping angela merkel's mobile phone. it is the most serious diplomatic tensions since germany opposed the u.s.-led iraq invasion. according to a german lawmaker, american met in moscow. crowded into the press conference to see what there was to say about the meeting with edward snowden and the letter to the government. edward snowden be willing to talk to german investigators or politicians or even come to germany to be interviewed? he could come to germany if it were guaranteed that he would be secure in germany or a comparable country. the green and the left party want to question snowden about u.s. surveillance activity. he could be offered asylum or safe passage in return. christian democrats it would exacerbate tensions with washington. one alternative being discussed is to meet with snowden in moscow. usif snowden was to provide with information, we will take that into consideration. verification or new information
and winning several others. and first moscow, now berlin, former american contractor edward snowden says he will help a u.s. -- a german investigation into u.s. surveillance programs. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. a high-ranking taliban official says the leader of the taliban and pakistan has been killed in a u.s. drone strike. the missiles are said to have targeted his house and his car in the north, as a meeting was underway. others, including his brother, are also reported to have died in the attack. richard galpin is following developments from islamabad. i spoke with him just a short time ago. richard, what has been the reactions to the death? >> certainly amongst politicians here in islamabad, particularly the opposition, there has been real dismay about what has happened. some of them describing it as a deliberate attempt by the united states to try to sabotage the hopes of some kind of talks taking place between the pakistan government and the pakistan taliban to bring a cease-fire and hopefully some kind of peace settlement bet
on leaks by edward snowden. in a moment we will be joined by journalist glenn greenwald who first broke the snowden story. first, we turn to saturday's protest in washington. it was organized by the stop watching us coalition. jesselyn radack, a former justice department who now works for the government accountability project, read a message from edward snowden. >> we are here to remind our government officials that they are public service -- servants. this is about the unconstitutional, unethical, and immoral actions of the modern- day surveillance state, and how we all must work together to remind the government to stop them. know,bout our right to our right to associate freely, and to live in a free and open democratic society. [applause] witnessing an american moment in which ordinary people from high school to high office stand up to oppose a dangerous trend in government. we are told what is unconstitutional is not illegal. but we will not be fooled. we have not forgotten the fourth amendment in our bill of rights prohibits government that only from searching our personal effects
snowden. the former national security agency contractor who released thousands of classified documents about government surveillance in one of the most significant leaks in u.s. history. he's been charged with espionage and has been living in russia under temporary asylum. the american journalist at the center of the story lives in brazil. >> we've had to come to rio to speak to glenn greenwald. he hasn't returned to the united states since he broke the story about the nsa surveillance programs for fear of being prosecuted. >> the nsa's goal really is the elimination of privacy globally. it is literally a system designed to monitor all forms of human behavior inside the united states, which is the ultimate surveillance state. >> last december, glenn greenwald received an email from a person who didn't identify himself. >> we still didn't know who he was, where he worked, but he was saying he had access to large amounts of very sensitive surveillance information that show the united states government was violating the law and abusing it's power. >> suddenly in my lap had dropped some of
edward snowden, a spanish newspaper reported the nsa collected numbers and locations of the phone calls, but not actual content. this after learning that the nsa has also been tuning into the communications up dirty five world leaders. now the european union parliamentary delegation is preparing for a visit to the u.s. to express concerns over nsa surveillance tactics. political commentator sam sacks brings us more. >> german intelligence officials will come to washington dc to demand answers from the white house about surveillance on chancellor angela merkel. is a marked the partner from just a few months ago, when germany was defending its foes cooperation with the nsa. that was after edward snowden leak in june that the nsa was collecting a half ilya and telephone and internet telik communications every month. chancellor angela merkel was put to defend her government's cooperation with the nsa, saying it prevented terrorist attacks. we can only protect the population if we cooperate with others, her office said. edward snowden describe the cozy relationship between german spies and t
by edward snowden. what he is now asking dpor -- asking for as washington tries to rebuild some relationships. >> it is vital when it comes to america safe and keeping our european allies safe. as i said earlier, the tensions that have been caused by these disclosures are ones that we acknowledge and ones we are addressing directly. >>> a check of the headlines. plans are in the work tips to prove the quality of life in the largest syrian refugee camp. it is home to more than 100,000 people that fled the civil war. they are swapping their squad cars for big rigs. the reason? by sitting up higher they have a chance of spotting drivers who are texting. >>> and there is going to be a partial solar eclipse visible to most of the east coast tomorrow at sunrise. get up early. it is a rare eclipse where the moon blocks part of the sun and completely in other parts of the world. >> obamacare was the focus of withering hearings this week over the website tee yeahs scow that put the white house on the defensive and em boldened the critics. >> the central issue here is not can we build a g
. in the stream of new revelations from the snowden documents, it can be hard to grasp. sure, the government is collecting information, but what does that really mean for someone's life? to find out, we went to a meet a group of people who definitely know they're being spied on. >> after 9/11 it wasn't just the nsa that increased surveillance on u.s. citizens. here at the city level in new york, the nypd actually brought in two senior officials from the cia to help run a program to spy on its own citizens. >> the program, which was uncovered by the associated press, is targeting one community: muslims. secret documents show that the nypd is conducting surveillance of entire muslim neighborhoods and infiltrating dozens of mosques and muslim student groups. >> they visited bookstores, they visited cafes, they visited hookah joints, and of course they visited mosques... >> informants record conversations using hidden microphones, collect the names and phone numbers of congregants and even photograph them. >> they were listening for, you know, what were people talking about, how were they reacti
a big deal of it now though? >> the snowden leaks shoved it from the shadows and this quiet understanding out into the spotlight. >> how embarrassed is she? she is basically the empress with no clothes. the u.s. was tapping her cell phone. what is fascinating to the story is, yes, everybody knows and there are treaties we have with certain countries countries and we entered into this. we will not spy. we don't have the treaty with germany. there is no international law that says they can't do this. germany is lobbying with the united nations to have a resolution to ban the u.s. spying. what does president obama do? he voluntarily relinquished his own power. this is completely unprecedented. this is super important. economically no countries are investing in the united states. nobody wants to store their data here anymore. they want a data secure bank of switzerland. it is totally ruining the industry. so we have senator feinstein and a lot of democrats calling for accountability. that's for the nsa spying on american citizens. where is the committee looking into the nsa and
not been a highlight of the edward snowden documents but shows how america is using the information to collect foreign information. >> p.j. crowley, european leaders are expressing outrage. how much of that is legitimate? how many of them had known that this is happening? >> well, there is an intelligence issue, and beneath the surface there is a deep relationship among intelligence that serve american interests as well as european interests, a lot of cooperation and information sharing, which is why there has been progress in combating terrorism. we're in a better position than, say, 12 years ago. the united states has been through this before with wikileaks. you had 250,000 state department documents, many classified cables. you've got awkward conversations. how could european leaders say how could you call me vain. but obviously at the end of the day interest drive relationships but politics makes relationships. you're seeing steps being taken politically to try to manage this, and stabilize the situation. it will obviously take some ti time. >> mike rogers, chairman of the intel
sets guidelines for the nsa bold collection of information. former contractor edward snowden leet important information on how -- leaked detailed information on how this is done. a number of proposals have been sent to improve transparency and strengthen privacy protections to further build the confidence of the american public and our nations fisa programs. i am joined now by sam sacks, who is live at the capital. the hearing was supposed to consider a number of proposals.e proposals entail? >> good to be with you. just to recap, the pfizer court is this top-secret court -- this fisa court is this top-secret court that provides the oversight over the nsa. they have to go to this court to get a lot of these court orders. the problem is that nobody really knows what goes i inside. the opinions are classified. there's only one arguer and it is from the government and there is no one representing the privacy of the individual from whom the government is turned to get information from. so today was about getting more transparency and a number of ideas were brought up, such as a proces
frederick, but how are you doing? >> edward snowden's nsa revelations reaching new heights, getting spoofed on snl. but now the leaker is seeking ce clemens city. >>> and toronto's embattled mayor says he will stay in office. >>> and the sbepgs intentional that was the youtube music awards. that's a real thing? it is? okay. this is "way too early". good morning. i'm bill karins in for brian shactman. it's monday, november 4th. we'll also show and you scary moment in last night's texas/colt game. but first, the country's third biggest airport fully up and running again, but underlying safety concerns after a man used an assault arrival to kill one tsa agent and badly injured two other people. paul ciancia is in critical condition after being shot multiple times by officers. he was carrying five high capacity magazines, a bag of ammo and happennd written lette explaining his rampage. gun control advocates say the incident is unlikely to spark any head way in the limit of gun sales. >>> later today, the president will speak at an organizing for action health care summit looking to rally grass
. >>> and edward snowden says british counterparts to the nsa are some of the worst offenders to government oversight. >>> welcome to "around the world." police came within minutes of stopping the alleged l.a.x. shooter from heading to the airport before friday's rampage. one. new details we're learning today. this is from an exclusive interview with a woman who knows the suspect and his three roommates. 23-year-old paul ciancia is charged with murdering a tsa officer. ciancia is in critical condition after being shot by police officers. the fbi says he set out to kill tsa employees, and now a woman who knows the suspect tells our miguel marquez, that one roommate, who had no idea what was going on, even drove him to the airport. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he said he was going back home. either that his dad was kind of sick and he had to deal with some family issues. >> did anyone ever see a ticket? >> no. >> he did mention what day. that morning, he doesn't knock and says, i need to leave. can you take me now. >> d
for wednesday. >> nsa whistleblower edward snowden has been charged with espionage. but he wants to be let off the hook saying they are looking to criminalize a local speech in a letter friday the northbounding sa whistleblower asked for international hope to persuade the us to give him clemency. >> he violated u.s. law. he should return to the united states and face justice. >> snowden has also indicated that he would like to testify before congress withoabout the surveillance program but lawmakers wonsay that won't hap either. >> houston taking on the colts. the texans were rolling through the first half. andre johnson pulls in his third touchdown of the game. texans up 21-3. what we told you about texan's head coach gary kubiak collapsing it's down there from houston they go on to drop their 6th straight. 27-24. raider rs taking on the eagles. it was the colts the eagles quarterback shutting down the raider's defense for a record tieing 7 touchdown passes. connecting with riley cooper for three of his 7 touchdowns. finishing the became 406 yards, 7 touchdowns no interceptions. >> it was a d
countries. the resolution is expected to be voted on later this month. >> n.s.a. leader edward snowden is speaking up and reaching out. the germans are interested in bringing him to berlin if he tells them about the surveillance of german chancellor angela merkel. >> david chater reports from moscow. >> edward snowden shows every sign of going native. the snapshot showing him enjoying a river cruise in moscow. he held a meeting with an mp from the green party. he said their discussions were revealing. at a press conference the mp said edward snowden would about willing to go germany as a witness to the bugging of angela merkel's phone by the u.s. >> translation: he told me he could imagine coming to germany if it was clear he could remain here in safety. this means granting free passage and asylum. the interior minister could offer this and fulfil the moral obligation to help him. >> it's reported edward snowden is starting a job in st. petersburg as a technical advisor to russia's version of facebook. he may not be happy with the news that the federal security service in moscow is be
and nsa spying story. all of it coming by leaks by the former u.s. defense contractor edward snowden. tonight's revelations involve very big names in the internet and e-mail world. now big companies are calling for new privacy laws to stop u.s. intelligence agencies from breaking into their data overseas. for more on all of it we turn to our chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell in our d.c. newsroom tonight. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the tech companies worry they are losing an arm's race with the nsa which nbc news confirms has been hacking into google and yahoo data centers around the world as fast as the company has put up firewalls. vacuuming up e-mail and phone records. google and yahoo data centers in all corners of the globe reach targets by data collection by nsa and british intelligence. as first reported in the "washington post" they found more documents leaked by edward snowden, hundreds of thousands of e-mails, search queries and other activity collected, decoded and filtered and possible intelligence targets transmitted to the n
snowden who dumped all of this information out in to the public arena. met with him last week in russia. he said he would try to enlist his help to investigate the nsa and suggested that he be brought back to this country and given clemency. what would be your reaction to that? >> my reaction would be negative. first of all, this is an american, he was a contractor he was tested. he stripped our system, he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone to call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee and say, look, i have some information you ought to see. and we would certainly see him. maybe both together, maybe separately but we would have seen him and we would have looked at that information. that didn't happen. and now he's done this enormous disservice to our country. and i think the answer is, no clemency. >> schieffer: in other words, if the united states could get their hands on him you would suggest that he be prosecuted. >> that's correct. >> schieffer: let me shift to the roll out of obamacare. this thing seems to b
will be bringing you will they sit back as they happen. actor turned whistleblower entered snowden has released a man if aso calling on the world to uphold laws and values which limits are beyond and protect human rights. he also slammed the us and uk spine agencies is the worst offenders the text appeared in a german magazine le sands to the editors from on stove on an encrypted channel ideas in oliver has more on the teacher's statement the spa nice comfy loads to the taste of politics. that's according to whistleblower edward snowden right thing in the major german news weekly dish beagle he's put forward what he calls his manifesto for truth in which he calmed and state security agencies around the world didn't set out to simeon only handle so that journalists that if published his articles in various publications around the world. he also delays on to saying that we need to stop this kind of spying culture that is taken over it's all parts of a teenager and that and make a set of articles about edward snowden inmates in the gym and paper it comes on the back if that support for edwards to
from spain. this is based on documents provided by edward snowden. >> arriving for an uncomfortable meeting, the u.s. ambassador in major it has questions to answer after a spanish newspaper published elite documents showing u.s. intelligence services tracked more than 60 million phone calls made in spain between december and january of this year. a massive 3.5 million calls in one day. they say the monitoring appears to track where the calls were made and how long they lasted, but not their content. the spanish government has demanded full details about what information was collected from their citizens. >> as always, we learn about what is going on after it has happened. that is how it is with american intelligence. they are always ahead of us. >> it is a disgrace they are spying on governments and ministers. we will see what happens, but to me, this is a very serious violation. >> it comes after the prime rejected calls for an eu wide no-spying agreement. they wanted more information before supporting the special arrangement with the united states. he white house has denied that
of revelations by former nsa analyst, edward snowden. documents he leaked showed phone calls of millions of ordinary citizens. testimony of keith alexander and others told the committee the content is secret in a lock box unless there is a link to terrorism. that, they say, is rare. >> it would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulate suspicion that we had connection to a foreign al qaeda or related terrorist group, and look into that box. in 2002 we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the committee hearing there was relatively little discussion about allegations the u.s. spied on america's allies. at the white house it was a hot topic. prote press secretary jay carney said president obama assured angela merkel that there was not and will not be spying on her. >> this is what he said about france and spain. >> i have no information. >> senator dianne fienstein says she does not think it is proper for america to spy on the leaders of allied nation. the white house ordered a top to bottom review o
's aw at this hour, star with the latest leak from former nsa contractor edward snowden. says theington post" national security agency has been hacking be data links that connect google and yahoo! around the world. laways the agency skirt the by collecting data from millions of local web users via underwater fiber-optic cables. kate moody explains. >> world leaders, foreign citizens, and internet giants, the latest victims of the national security agency's surveillance programs according to intelligence linked by edward snowden. the nsa has admitted to the program to access internet user accounts but described new reports that infiltrated yahoo! and google databases as factually incorrect. breakings not an essay into any databases. it would be illegal for us to do that. -- does collect information on terrorists and our national intelligence priorities, but we are not authorized to go into a u.s. company's servers and take data. we have to go to a court process for doing that. >> but the "washington post" says there is more to the story, reporting details of a separate over program-- nsa
reapareciÓ edward snowd snowden, buscado por filtrar informaciÓn secreta. se le ve paseando un barco, la fotografÍa fue dada por un portal, y coincide con el que su abogado dijo que acaba de conseguir trabajo en una compaÑÍa de internet. >>> y la compaÑÍa que manejÓ la certificaciÓn de antecedentes de edward snowden, alegan que la empresa no aplicÓ controles de calidad cuando investigÓ a edward snowden. >>> hace 20 aÑos la asesinato de un cardenal de guadalajara puso en el mundo al joaquÍn "el chapo" guzmÁn, afectÓ tambiÉn la vida de muchas otras personas. son las historias personales de los protagonistas en ese fatÍdico dia. >>> este es una historia paralela cuyos actores no se pueden despegar, el cardenal posado ocampo. guadalajara velaba el cuerpo de su cardenal asesinado a plena luz del dÍa. y justicia clamaba la multitud al presidente carlos salinas mientras este llegaba al funeral. >>> le pedi padre mÍo si tu permitiste que pasara esto danos suficiente fuerza para salir adelante. >>> hace 20 aÑos angelina pedÍa justicia para ella y sus hijos. el remordimiento se
that killed a u.s. ambassador. >> accused nsa leaker edward snowden making new friends and maybe looking for a new home. germany maybe? >> and unearthed a drug tunnel between mexico and the united states that is so sophisticated, it is being called a supertunnel. we're going to take you on a tour. welcome to around the world". i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers with us all week. >> first we're going to get to this, benghazi, libya, it was just last ept, four americans were killed in a terrorist attack. one of them the u.s. ambassador. >> today a lot of pressure from republicans in congress to hear directly from cia operatives who were in libya during the attack and also afterwards. so far they have not talked to congress. >> we here at cnn have reported the cia has specifically told those operators to keep quiet. drew griffin is with the cnn investigations unit. drew, first of all, excellent reporting on all of this. they're pushing back right now on what you're reporting. what are they saying? >> being complet
's irresponsible with all due respect, mark. >> thank you very much to all of you. >>> up next, edward snowden writes a manifesto and says he has proof he did nothing wrong. talk about whether someone's a patriot or not. that's the question. >>> and later, a true american hero, iron man come to life in the pentagon right now u and a shout out. singer rheanna has done something she's never done before. her current number one is the monster. a collaboration with rapper em. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know the ancient pyramids were actually a mistake? uh-oh. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you kno
. >>> coming up on "new day," a few proceed from edward snowden. he says he's no criminal. wait until you hear our response from the leaders in the nation's capitol. he says he is sorry for past mistakes for smoking co-cable. he will not resign and he wants the public to see the alleged evidence. t thing i need. seriously? let's take this puppy over to midas and get you some of the good 'ol midas touch. hey you know what? i'll drive! i really didn't think this through. brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling) hall we do is go out to dinner.? that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...what? he's using you. he probably has a citi thankyou card and gets 2x the points at restaurants. so he's just racking up points with me. some people... ugh! no, i've got it. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards american express credit card, every purchase earns you 2% cash back, which is deposited in your fidelity account. is that it? actually... there's no annual fee and no l
later, edward snowden began releasing revelations about massive surveillance that our government was doing. this kicked off a healthy public debate about how we balance privacy and security. as you heard from greg, it is our mission at rand to improve the quality of public policy decision-making. that is why we brought together this panel. people who have different views. everyone here has deep expertise. we are hoping to have an open discussion. there will be some things and questions they will be unable to answer because of the situations. we will try to guide the discussion over a few topics. we will start with trying to understand what works with intelligence security and why we feel we need to put measures in place. we are then going to turn to what are the increased risks of mass collection of data on the public? finally, what are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no random
as the leaks keep on coming from edward snowden from the top adviser to the president about what the president knew and when he knew it. first today's trivia question. what is the most populous state with one woman in its congressional delegation. the first person to tweet the correct question will get the on air shout out. the answer and more coming up next. [ female announcer ] who are we? we are the thinkers. the job jugglers. the up all-nighters. and the ones who turn ideas into action. we've made our passions our life's work. we strive for the moments where we can say, "i did it!" ♪ we are entrepreneurs who started it all... with a signature. legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses, turning dreamers into business owners. and we're here to help start yours. i remember thinking there's a lot i have to do... check my blood sugar, eat better. start insulin. today i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said with levemir® flexpen... i don't have to use a syringe and a vial. levemir® flexpen comes prefilled with long-acting insulin taken once daily for
merkel's phone and allowed it to continue. it came out after edward snowden said the u.s. has spied on world leaders. what president obama spoke to chancellor merkel when the two spoke about the spying. >> the president said we're not going to do this going forward. >> but it may have been done in the past. >> we don't want to get into the business of inventorying everything we've done in the past but what we're looking at is how can we both make necessary reforms in how we gather intelligence and how can we be more transparent about what we're doing with our allies and the public. >> joining me now ambassador mark ginsburg. it's great to have you here. the white house finds itself caught between a rock and a hard place. now they have to come out and ask for forgiveness as opposed to permission, because they never would have gotten permission to do this. but this is not unheard of. this is what we do as a country. >> spies r us. >> we've been doing it for a long time. is it just the fact that we are surprised that it would get to this level and now expect to believe that the white h
on information from edward snowden, following allegations that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. the white house denies that. congressman peter king and former vice president dick chaney said the u.s. should stop apologising for the nsa surveillancism. >> overall intelligence is important and need to be preserved. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states, but france and germany and throughout europe. the french are ones to talk - the fact is they've carried out spying against the united states - both government and industry. >> jeanne shaheen of new hampshire takes a different stance, calling on the nsa to come clean about surveillance programs. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. we have repair twork do. we have hard questions we need to ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> meanwhile -
data on americans. edward snowden's revelation confirmed it was a lie. the latest i heard it within a month, the nsa spied on more than 124 billion phone calls worldwide. that means that every single person on earth is facing the risk of being caught up in the dragnet. the person, edward snowden, he is holed up in russia because here in the states he would sure be in jail by now. >> people at the rally demanded a meaningful surveillance law reform. they came with a petition signed by more than 500 thousand people asking for an investigation. senate judiciary committees plan hearings on those programs so they want to make sure their forces are heard. one of the main messages of this rally as watch the watchers. the question is, is it really possible? so far, and he liked that has been shed on the watchers was three whistleblowers. >> more details and updates on the battle for privacy and ask her and analysis -- and expert analysis. a suicide bombing killed six people in southern russia on monday. dozens more injured. it went off in a packed bus. we retrace the events of the sad day.
edward snowden may have information about how much cooperation european governments gave to the surveillance. >> as they wrap up meetings on capitol hill, what are they saying after the first meeting emerges. >> reporter: this is part of an european inquiry set up a few months ago. this has been long planned. the first stop at chairman of the house intelligence mike rogers who said he didn't understand what all the fuss was about, that they should be glad europe is spying on them because its keeping them safe. not much there. there is talk of ongoing dialogue but the chairman of european union foreign affairs has said confidence has been damaged. >> has anything been said that their spying headquarters have been linked so they can share the spy information. >> reporter: that's the big question, what we haven't learned from the edward snowden is the amount of cooperation from the european governments and the national security agency. this is something that they have been very concerned about. as far as world leaders who are talking about things, angela merkel and so on, yo
on other nations, especially our allies and friends. it's all coming from one man, edward snowden and the secrets he made off before he left as a u.s. intelligence analyst. now the white house is scrambling to soothe feelings while fielding questions about how much the president knew. we begin in washington tonight with nbc's andrea mitchell. andrea, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the white house is under fire from its closest allies. for the first time the president is promising to limit the nsa's extraordinary reach saying what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. that likely means not spying on foreign leaders who happen to be good friends and allies. across europe, an uproar today. the u.s. ambassador to spain under siege. called on the carpet to explain reports that the nsa was vacuuming up telephone data, tracking 60 million calls in spain in less than a month according to el mundo. germany today called for an investigation into nsa's tapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. the interior minister said the chancellor
>>> former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden has a new job. he is working in technical support at one of russia's largest websites. edward snowden lawyers would not name the company but says that he started work tomorrow. the 30-year-old was granded asylum in moscow this year. he is facing espionage charms in the united states. >> the troubled health care website is back. for now. a networking problem caused the website to crash on tuesday night stopping people from submitting applications. the service was restored yesterday and others not back on line until this morning. there have been major issues with the site reventing people from registering and applying for insurance coverage. >> if you plan to fly for the holiday, here is the magic date: the lowest fares will be found if you book before november 12. a domestic round trip flight costs an average of $314 if you book before then. prices will suddenly spike on november 13th based on air fare the past three years. also, you will find the best deals if you fly on december 23rd or december 24th right before christmas day. >> meteorologist mike
. >> these are the slides leaked by whistleblower edward snowden in june. as long as the national security agency or the federal bureau of investigation are 51% sure that the user is foreign, their emails, audio and video chats, photographs and documents are all theirs for the searching. this >> carefully worded denials followed from the companies, arguing that they give specific information to the u.s. government as legally required on a case-by-case basis. these assurances have been left irrelevant with the news and release of a new slide showing that the n.s.a. bypassed this system, gaining entry to yahoo and google's data centres by breaking into their fibre optic cables. u.s. citizens no longer receive protections as all the information is considered foreign. >> the real concern is the government uses the tapping of overseas cablings as a back door. >> one thing is clear - any data protections that exist are only for u.s. citizens. >> if you are a non-american outside the united states, basically they have a free pass to do what they like. >> the white house derives that authority from execu
's leaders. this after documents from edward snowden suggest that the u.s. was bugging angela merkel xfone -- angela merkel's a phone. they met to ask about the claims and edward snowden said he was willing to help the german government investigate. police in california have begun investigations into the shooting at los angeles airport that killed a security officer and disrupted more than 700 flights across the united states. the alleged shooter, a 27-year- old man stormed into a terminal, killing one officer and injuring at least three other people. the police shot and injured him before taking him into custody. police say he had more than 100 rounds of ammunition. back in the headlines as sectarian violence has claimed 7000 lives this year alone. the most violence they have seen since 2008. they are struggling to push back al qaeda. hase minister al-maliki called for more support from the united states. october was the bloodiest month in iraq in nine years, as 7000 people died in the strikes between sunni and shiite. the government of a rack cannot get the violence under control on thei
was terminated after the white house learned of it. meanwhile in the latest example of edward snowden screwing over america the spanish newspaper reported that the nsa monitored the 60 million phone calls made in spain -- i didn't know they had that many phones -- last december. they refused to grant snowden asylum. >> see if that is not bullying, i don't know what bullying is, and i think there should be an organization to punish those dogs. did the president know about the spying on merkel or did he not know or did he not not know. >> remember, merkel rhymes with erkle. >> merkel. i don't know if he knew, but there is nobody more frustrated and more outraged than president obama. we should just trust he can get to the bottom. >> i think he is upset. he gets things done. if he didn't know we were listening in on the phone calls of our friendly government leader should he have? shouldn't he let the nsa do what they want to do? >> no, we know two things. he was the last to know and no one is more upset. but it is weird how he knows nothing. he is the last to know other than killing bin laden be
if edward snowden lost sean penn, he has to many can be hasn't lost me. >> any concerns? >> i don't know what's in his mind. i don't know what he's doing now. he might be in a hot tub with two russian strippers named i want to drink a lot. he's done some service, getting us to at least debate the issue and as far as stuff gone on the last week or so with the european allies being up sit, i can understand if they felt their personal cell phones were being tapped. but on the other hand, they should really climb a little bit. it's been 60, 70 years since america defended allies, especially in europe. we liberated europe twice in the last century. they never wanted to pay the premiums for being protected. cut us a little slack when we protect you. the 9/11 plot was hatched in germany. there are much more restive muslim populations on the european continent than here. we over do it all. there is no doubt about that. cut us slack for the protection we've given you-all this time. >> that could be an endorsement of what the nsa has been doing and what you said about edward snowden. so where do y
snowden. glenn greenwald joins us tonight. want to play something vice president dick cheney said to jay tapper when he interviewed him earlier this week. tapper asked him about edward snowden. i want to play what he said. >> the problem with snowden is he had access to classified information. he violated conditions under which they got those. he's a traitor, pure and simple. and i don't think you can judge him any other way. there's some people who say he's a whistle-blower. he's talked about methods and ways we collect intelligence. >> a number of people said and come around and changed their opinion but clearly vice president cheney has not, doesn't sound like he's going to. how do you respond to what he said? >> i'm really glad dick cheney is available to speak on this because i think he under scores the most important point. dick cheney engaged in some of the worst, most radical conduct in the last century in the united states and did it all in secret from lying about the war in iraq, to torturing people, to putting people in cages with no lawyers. to eavesdropping of the american p
snowden's leaked documents. this time about the nsa tapping world alabalealleys. fault lines correspondent explores what it is like to live under constant surveillance. ♪ >> in many ways the nsa surveillance story can seem abstract. sure the sgovment collecting information, but what does that really mean for someone's life? to fine out we went to meet a group of people who definitely know they are being spied on. >> after 9/11 it wasn't just the nsa that increased surveillance. here at the city level in new york, the nypd brought in to senior officials from the cia to help spy on its own citizens. the program is targeting one community, muslims. secret documents show that the nypd is conducting surveillance of entire muslim neighborhoods. >> they visited book stores, cafes, hookah joints, of course mosques. >> reporter: and record conversations using hidden microphones, collect the names and phone numbers of con gragaits. >> how were they reacting to foreign events abroad, the egyptian revolution or the cartoons about the profit mohammed, what were they saying in the surmonth. >> to just
and fuel which his company provided. >>> edward snowden wants the united states to drop charges against him. snowden has been charged with federal crimes for leaking classified u.s. documents. he released a letter to persuade u.s. authorities to let him off the hook. snowden says he wants to testify before congress about the nsa's surveillance programs. california senator dianne feinstein says he already had that chance. >> he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee and say look, i have information you ought to see. that didn't happen. >> the documents edward snowden released about the surveillance programs around the world have angered some u.s. allies. >>> barts board of directors is expected to hold a special meeting in the next two weeks to vote on a new deal. the contract agreement will keep bart trains running for at least the next four years. the unions voted on friday to approve the deal. the board is now expected to ratify the contract at its next meeting. it calls for a
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